Wedgwood The father of English potters

Wedgwood was established in 1759, when Josiah Wedgwood, 29, started his business as an independent potter in Burslem, Staffordshire, England. During his lifetime Josiah invented and produced three of Wedgwood’s most famous ceramic bodies – Queen’s Ware (1762), Black Basalt (1768) and Jasper (1774).

Today, Josiah Wedgwood is remembered as the “Father of English Potters”.

If you happen to be in the area, give yourself a few hours to take a look at The Wedgwood Museum in Barleston, Stoke-upon-Trent, UK. Here, you can browse through centuries of Wedgwood archives now recognised by the UNESCO Memory of the World programme.

Take a look at Shop It’s ode to Wedgwood Pinterest board, with beautiful Wedgwood pieces and how to display them once you bring them home…

#Our photo is of Wedgwood’s Black Basalt ware – repinned from our Pinterest board.

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Royal Delft

Royal Delft or Delftware is tin-glazed earthenware. It was first made in the early 17th century in the canal city of Delft in The Netherlands. It was these Dutch potters that would later bring the art of tin glazing to England.

I visited the Royal Delft factory and museum in December 2012, and I highly recommend it. For peek into how Royal Delft is made and some places in The Netherlands where you can purchase antique Delft, take a look at our Royal Delft Pinterest board.

Today, antique Royal Delft, in all its varied forms, is highly collectable. Think vases, urns, plates, the Tulip vase in its many shapes and sizes, and tiles.

Royal Delft is best known for the iconic blue and white design, but they do produce other colours and many different motifs.

Enjoy!